Kickstarter Project

k-logoWell, we didn’t make it with the recent Kickstarter project unfortunately. I had an incredible response from all the wonderful supporters and I would like to thank everyone who pledge money and those that retweeted and shared the link on Facebook to the Kickstarter website.

Are we downhearted? No, not a bit. The one thing that has come from running the project is that there are a lot of dedicated fans and enthusiasts who would like to see more films made. There may not be enough to make them on a TV production budget scale, but perhaps in time that will change. For the moment, if I am able to generate enough expenses to make these programmes then they can continue.

So, perhaps the answer is to try another Kickstarter project – this time a short duration and for a smaller target cost, something achievable and then get on and make another episode. I am very keen to get filming on another episode as soon as possible.

Also, I have had mixed reactions about the shorter format Bald Explorers on Youtube.com. I would be interested in your thoughts and comments. The longer format takes more time and effort to produce and is a higher quality product, and the shorter version (if I made new ones) would be simpler and less informative, but possibly easier to digest. The question is what is the right way to go?

Thanks again and more updates and news soon.

Humphrey Kynaston – A Highwayman in his Cave!

The highwayman Humphrey Kynaston was a bit of a Robin Hood character – robbing the rich to give to the poor. But who was he and where did he live?

I am the Bald Explorer, from UK television’s Community Channel and I am on the trail of this notorious blackguard. He had a fortified manor house in the village of Myddle in Shropshire, but at the beginning of the 15th Century he was outlawed for murdering a man and was forced to live in a cave.

Follow the other explorations of Richard Vobes as he goes around Britain in search of its myths and legends, history and heritage. Travel the UK and visit some of the places in the films he makes.

Myddle Castle, the home of a Highwayman!

Myddle Castle was the home to a highway man in the 15th Century. Now it is in ruins and fortunately protected. In this episode, the Bald Explorer is off in search of Humphrey Kynaston’s ancestral home to discover what is left of it.

Richard Vobes is TVs Bald Explorer and in each episode he is discovering more about Britain’s wonderful heritage. History is his passion and he loves to travel the UK to find wonderful places to visit.

Join him each episode, so don’t forget to subscribe the channel.

The tallest Doric Column in the world!

Where is the tallest Doric column in the world? Could you guess it was in Shropshire? Yes, it is in the county town – Shrewsbury and the Bald Explorer is off to visit.

If you want to find somewhere interesting to travel in Britain for heritage, then follow the antics of Richard Vobes. In this episode, he is climbing the steps of the 19th century inside an amazing structure, Lord Hill’s Column.

Burning the Lewes Martyrs…

Mary Tudor is best remembered by her nickname, Bloody Mary. She earned this by burning protestant heretics. Over 288 Marian Martyrs died as a result of her catholic faith, but was she really as bad as all that?

Richard Vobes, TV’s Bald Explorer (catch him on the Community Channel) is in Lewes in East Sussex to discover more about the 17 martyrs that were burned in front of the Town Hall.

Subscribe now to catch all the episodes from the mini-series as the Bald Explorer discovers Britain, its places, towns, villages, myths and legends. The Youtube channel is here: www.Youtube.com/BaldExplorer

 

Britain’s Worst Avalanche…

Hard to believe but in the south of England there was a terrible disaster – in fact, the worst avalanche in British history and it happened on the site where a pub stands as a reminder of this tragedy.

The Bald Explorer heads off to explore this tragic disaster in the Victorian era. He is in Lewes, in East Sussex. This town used to boast a number of splendid breweries, but now all have disappeared except Harvey’s. One of the pubs it supplies is the Snowdrop Inn where a terrible thing happened in 1836.