Video: Chanctonbury Ring, West Sussex

Richard Vobes takes a walk to the mysterious Chanctonbury Ring, the site of an old iron age hill fort and beauty spot. Its famed for the ring of tress that was planted there in the 18th century and the occult goings on. There was once a Roman Temple built on the top on the site of an earlier Pagan shrine.

This is an early Bald Explorer video that looks at our ancient history from a fresh perspective.

History You Can Touch


History You Can Touch is a study of the first monuments on the landscape of Great Britain, including the West Kennet Long Barrow in Wiltshire and the Belas Knapp Long Barrow in the Cotswolds.

England is littered with the remains of man from the early history. Richard Vobes is off to discover the first of the monuments left on this land by them and who were the early plunderers of their tombs and burial mounds.

With stunning photography and inventive computer graphics this short documentary proves to be the start of series of films looking at English history and culture.

Podcast: Murders Investigated

Murder has always been of interest to the Human condition. Who would be so bold to take another life? Why would any one do such a thing and how did they do it? It may be morbid curiosity but the plain fact is we all like a good murder well told and now you can purchase the Murder shows to listen to at your leisure.

The Acid Bath Murderer
John George Haigh killed and dissolved his murder victims in a bath of acid in a small workshop in Crawley, West Sussex in 1949. It was the case of the century.

Its February 1949, I am in Crawley, in West Sussex and there has been a murder! John George Haigh was 39 years old when he lured Mrs Durand-Deacon to his Crawley workshop on the pretext of showing some special plastic for an invention idea she had. Haigh shot her dead and put her fully clothed head first in to an oil drum and filled it with Sulphuric acid. Over the next five days, Mrs. Durand-Deacon’s body dissolved into a pile of yellow sludge which Haigh dumped close to his work shop. He thought he had the perfect murder, for without a body the Police couldn’t prove anything…. …. at least that’s what he thought!


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Download as Podcast.

The Brighton Trunk Murder – 1934

Its July 1934, I am in Brighton, in East Sussex and there has been a murder! Tony Mancini, also known as Cecil Louis England, was questioned concerning the discovery of body parts in trunks deposited at the left-luggage offices of Brighton and King’s Cross railway stations in July 1934. Not convinced he was completely innocent the Police searched his basement flat in Kemp St, Brighton, close to the railway station and discovered the body of prostitute Violet Kaye in a trunk at the foot of his bed. He was tried at the Lewes Assizes for her murder, but was acquitted. In 1976 he confessed to the murder…


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Download as Podcast.

Podcast: True’s Yard, Kings Lynn, Norfolk

True’s Yard is all that remains of King’s Lynn’s old fishing community, the North End, which existed for hundreds of years, and which was finally demolished in the clearances of the 1930’s and the 1960’s. Once hundreds of families lived within a stone’s throw of their chapel of St Nicholas, which still dominates the area, and the North End had its own boat builders, chandlers, sail makers, pubs, bake houses and school. Now, although the fishing fleet still sails regularly from King’s Lynn, the old way of life has gone.

But the hard and sometimes dangerous life they led, bred a fierce loyalty in the Northenders – they supported each other in times of crisis, seldom married anyone from outside the North End (adultery was virtually unknown), and cared for their widows and orphans. The menfolk, in their traditional ‘ganseys’, would sail up to 100 miles away to bring in their catch, and their women would tend the children, wait and pray, and mend the nets when they came home. A visit to True’sYard today, which is dedicated to preserving the memory of those people, still conveys much of that feeling of gritty endurance against the odds.

Paul Richards takes me around the museum along with Jimmy and Greg who were with me.

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Podcast: The Cheddar Gorge

In March 2008, Paul Stoneman and I took a trip to the Cheddar Gorge in Somerset. We decided to go when it was off season to avoid the crowds and do three important things. First was to have a walk around the famous gorge and see for ourselves just how impressive it was. Second we want to go in to one of the caves, not only find out if there were any cheeses stored in there, but to learn more about the geology and the man who dedicated his life to opening up the caves to the public and Third, we wanted to visit the last remain proper cheese making company that produced Cheddar Cheese and sample the delicious stuff.

The Cheddar Gorge Exporation

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Download as Podcast.

The Cheddar Gorge Cave Trip – Gough’s Cave

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Download as Podcast.

Download as Podcast.

The Cheddar Gorge Cheese Company Visit

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Podcast: Hastings Caves Explored!

Trevor White took Mr. Pegram and I deep into the old smugglers caves in Hastings, East Sussex. He is the Attractions Manager there as well as historian and what an enthusiastic chap he turned out to be, extremely passionate about his rather special caves. Take a listen to part of the exclusive audio tour above.

A Smugglers Adventure is an extensive exhibition about 18th Century smuggling and incorporates a museum and video theatre. The highlight of the attraction is the Adventure Walk, in which visitors travel the length and breadth of the caves, with dramatic scenes, numerous push-button effects and also a few surprises. The romantic, yet often bloody heyday of the smuggler is brought to life in this themed experience and captures the danger and excitement of a turbulent period in English history.

And as the advertising goes, Family fun, these underground caverns will reveal a secret Hastings as you explore its smuggling, bootlegging and gangland past. A themed experience with 75 life-size figures, you’ll walk through a 44m tunnel once used by the real smugglers of Hastings history. Concealed in their underground safe haven, smugglers stored goods such as alcohol, tobacco, paper, silk, sugar and spices here. You’ll visit the eerie, underground St. Clements Chapel. Be warned. The chapel is believed to be haunted. These caves also served as shelters in WWII air raids.

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Download as Podcast.